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Low Impact Housing for Cities

October 21, 2016 by Sebastien Miller

Low Impact Development (LID) is commonly defined as: ‘Development which, by virtue of its low or benign environmental impact, may be allowed in locations where conventional development is not permitted’ (1).  More understandably, this means that LID housing is temporary in nature, made of natural / locally sourced materials, and is...[read more]

Chamber Musicians are Placemakers, too!

October 20, 2016 by Project for Public Spaces

New Orleans street scene, 2012 | Image via Louisiana Division of the ArtsWhat do you get when you cross chamber music and placemaking? This is not a joke! The Sound Places program, the first of its kind, combines music, placemaking, and civic engagement by integrating musicians-in-residence into community life in Louisiana. Chamber Music...[read more]

New “Safe Sleep Policy” Legalizes Homeless Camping in Portland, Oregon

October 14, 2016 by The Global Grid

Tents pitched along a Portland streetPortland’s homeless population has been on a steady increase the past several years, eventually forcing the city to declare a homeless emergency at the end of 2015. This gave the city power to waive land-use restrictions so they could convert existing buildings into emergency shelter space and start...[read more]

Seattle becomes first US city to ban green, brown plastic produce bags

October 10, 2016 by Waste Dive

The Seattle City Council has unanimously approved a plan to ban green and brown plastic produce bags to eliminate composting confusion.[read more]

Malibu, California Bans Harmful Pesticides After City Council Finds Catastrophic Impact on Wildlife

October 6, 2016 by The Global Grid

While pesticides are known for effectively and quickly removing unwanted pests, they can also contain substances that are harmful to both wildlife and the environment. Sparked by the death of a young mountain lion in Los Angeles due to ingesting rat poison, people began to advocate against the use of pesticides. After great debate and...[read more]

Making Streets More Friendly in St. Paul, MN

October 5, 2016 by Project for Public Spaces

Victorian Bridge Haitian dance performance by Afoutayi Music & Dance Company Photo by Jon PavlicaLaughter, lively music, and delicious food from around the world fill St. Anthony Avenue in St. Paul, Minnesota as a crowd whoops it up at the Better Bridges Bash.Even chilly temperatures and gusty winds can’t dampen folks’ enthusiasm—nor...[read more]

Learning From a One-Stop, Urban Epic–and Why

September 28, 2016 by Chuck Wolfe

Spoiler alert: I love epic stories with universal meaning for varied audiences around the world. In sum, that is why I think Jonathan F.P. Rose‘s new book will become a must-read classic. And, if 400-pagers are not your style, it’s at worst a well-written, must-browse wonder, with relevant lessons for us all.Rose is a real estate...[read more]


How Can Hong Kong Tackle Its Waste Problem?

September 26, 2016 by William Ng

On a sunny Saturday morning earlier this month, I went on the public tour of the EcoPark with 14 other people from the Green Sustainable Living Meetup group, to find out more about Hong Kong’s waste management and recycling industry.Fully operational in 2007, EcoPark is “Hong Kong's first recycling-business park”. Apart from providing 13...[read more]

A Memorial to a Sad Future

September 23, 2016 by The Dirt ASLA

Climate Chronograph / Erik Jensen and Rebecca SunterThe winner of the Memorials for the Future competition, which was sponsored by the National Park Service, Van Alen Institute, and others, offers a depressing vision: a monument to our collective failure to stave off climate change. Climate Chronograph by Erik Jensen, Assoc. ASLA, and...[read more]

How Big Business Can Fix a Problem of its Own Making

September 22, 2016 by Yaniv Vardi

Our environment today exists under immense strain. It’s no secret that humanity’s current rates of consumption are unsustainable—especially in the developed world. The problem is a mix of over-demand, incredible waste, lack of regulatory oversight and poor material management. Broadly speaking, those factors share one common denominator...[read more]

One year later: Industry navigating uncharted territory to help reach 2030 food waste reduction goal

September 21, 2016 by Waste Dive

One year after the federal government announced a national goal of cutting food waste in half by 2030, the recycling industry is still figuring out how it fits into the equation.[read more]

A sense of the temporary

September 20, 2016 by Robert Kwolek

There is a troubling, permanent sense of the temporary in London, something you can feel in neighborhoods across the social strata, from Hackney to Kensington. This is unhealthy both for the city and its individuals because it prevents residents from putting down roots, and feeling at "home" in their city. Regular readers know...[read more]