Sign up | Login with →


Advances in Bike Sharing Access in Chicago, Illinois

October 17, 2016 by The Global Grid

A Divvy station at 55th St. and Woodlawn Ave. on the South Side of ChicagoSince over 600 cities worldwide have their own bike share programs, one would hope that Chicago, ranked the sixth most bike-friendly city in the United States, would have a strong program. Chicago’s Divvy Bikes, introduced in 2013, have seen a great expansion in...[read more]

Nice Ride Minnesota Creating Green Transportation across the Metro and Promoting Health and Wellness

October 6, 2016 by The Global Grid

The popularity of bike sharing programs is consistently increasing; as it promotes green transportation by reducing the use of motor vehicles in the city, benefits human wellness, and it’s a convenient alternative to cars. The Twin Cities is not trailing behind in the worldwide trend. In 2010, the Nice Ride Minnesota initiative started...[read more]

It’s time to put an end to bikeway “band-aids”

September 6, 2016 by Katrina Johnston-Zimmerman

We are finally moving in the right direction for bicycle urbanism in the United States. At last, more and more cities are realizing that what has been best practice in street design for years elsewhere, is the logical thing to do in this country as well. Separated lanes used to be seemingly out of reach – the long-term goal of the...[read more]


Main Street project aims to give central Tallinn back to the people

June 21, 2016 by Helen Saarniit

After decades of car-centred urban planning in the centre of Tallinn, the city has decided to give the centre back to its people and enliven urban culture by creating a 21st century Main Street: a shared urban space that is safe for pedestrians and cyclists, with more public transport and fewer cars.The design competition, organized by...[read more]

Lanes and Sharrows and Buffers…Oh My! Four Types of Bike Lanes Explained

June 6, 2016 by Jessica Soulliere

Chances are, you’ve noticed new street markings popping up on roads in and around your community: arrows with a bicyclist below, striped lanes with a bicyclist in the middle, or even plastic poles next to bike lanes. If you’re like most people, these markings raise more questions than they answer. Are they pointing me to where I can ride...[read more]

Beyond Emissions: 5 Cities Achieve Social and Economic Development by Reducing GHG Emissions from Transport

Low-carbon transport has many social and economic benefits that can accelerate local sustainable development and that deserve recognition beyond their role in addressing climate change. A new series of papers from the Low Emissions Development Strategies Global Partnership’s (LEDS GP) Transport Working Group highlights case studies that...[read more]


Federal Government Considers Changes in Street Design, Could Makes Roads Safer and more Sustainable

April 24, 2016 by James Dezao

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) sets standards for how streets, roadways and highways are designed. The agency is considering comments for possible changes to 13 criteria established in 1985 used to review road designs. Hopefully the FHWA will revise these criteria to make roads safer but also make them more sustainable and...[read more]

L.A. Joins Growing Number of U.S. Bike-Share Cities

March 31, 2016 by The Global Grid

Over 70 cities across the U.S. now offer bike-share systems for residents and visitors. I was surprised and proud to see my hometown of Buffalo, NY on‘s tally of bike-share programs across the United States. Buffalo – a city that sees 80 inches of snow, 36 inches of rain, and only about 155...[read more]

Ideas and Innovative Solutions for Sustainable Living

January 26, 2016 by Ivan Bruce

Connect4Climate recently co-hosted Sustainability Week, a series of panel discussions and events with the Hospital Club, a social venue in central London, created by Paul Allen co-founder of Microsoft and Dave Stewart of the Eurythmics, that encourages the free flow of ideas and innovative solutions. Sustainability Week, now in its third consecutive year, was a program sparked by its members in particular Steve Malkin, Guy Battle and Rupesh Madlani who were instrumental in arranging this year’s event. The Week brought together climate experts, industry leaders, city administrators and influencers with the creative minds of the Club’s members and invited guests in the days leading up to the United Nations Conference on Climate Change in Paris (COP21).[read more]

After Years of Silence the Mayor of Marseille, France Speaks Out About Cycling

January 21, 2016 by The Global Grid

The fact is rare enough to be remarkable. After several years of silence from the 21-year incumbent Mayor of Marseille, Jean-Claude Gaudin, finally spoke about the bicycle. And no less than twice in eight days. Don’t, however, expect a raving tirade in favor of cycling from the future president of the metropolis.[read more]

Cycling to the Boro-ichi Market in Setagaya, Tokyo

December 18, 2015 by Byron Kidd

Setagaya Boro-ichi has been officially recognised as one of Tokyo's intangible cultural assets dating back over 430 years. Beginning in he 1570s as a "free market" where taxes were removed to boost the ailing economy Boro-ichi flourished as a place to buy and sell old fabric scraps. Later Boro-ichi became a year-end market adding farming equipment and New Years goods to the list if items on sale and was held on December 15th each year.[read more]

Sustainable Transport: Building Equitable and Low-Carbon Cities

By the year 2030, one billion more people will need to access transport; of these individuals, 870 million will be located in Asia and Africa. Troublingly, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from transport—under a business-as-usual scenario—are projected to rise from 23 percent to 33 percent by 2050, according to the International Transport Forum.[read more]