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Land Use

ASLA Survey: Landscape Architecture Student Body Shifts

September 29, 2016 by The Dirt ASLA

ASLA 2016 Student Collaboration Honor Award. Bridging Disciplines/Cultivating Health: Using a collaborative international community design/build model to facilitate mental health treatment. University of Washington students / Daniel Winterbottom, FASLAASLA recently released its annual graduating student survey, which was completed by...[read more]

Learning From a One-Stop, Urban Epic–and Why

September 28, 2016 by Chuck Wolfe

Spoiler alert: I love epic stories with universal meaning for varied audiences around the world. In sum, that is why I think Jonathan F.P. Rose‘s new book will become a must-read classic. And, if 400-pagers are not your style, it’s at worst a well-written, must-browse wonder, with relevant lessons for us all.Rose is a real estate...[read more]

A Memorial to a Sad Future

September 23, 2016 by The Dirt ASLA

Climate Chronograph / Erik Jensen and Rebecca SunterThe winner of the Memorials for the Future competition, which was sponsored by the National Park Service, Van Alen Institute, and others, offers a depressing vision: a monument to our collective failure to stave off climate change. Climate Chronograph by Erik Jensen, Assoc. ASLA, and...[read more]

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The Rise Of The Rooftop

September 14, 2016 by Tom Oliver Payne

When designed to maximise public benefit, and not just private gain, rooftop spaces can enhance a city’s natural environment, and improve public life. The rise of the rooftop has just begun, but with this trend we may about to see the transformation of cities across the globe.[read more]

Why My Twitter Stream is Singing About Placemaking

September 13, 2016 by Chuck Wolfe

My Twitter stream is alive with the sound of placemaking.  While those are not the exact Sound of Music lyrics we remember, I am as guilty as anyone for hyping Placemaking Week in Vancouver, British Columbia (which begins September 12), using the increasingly popular twitter hashtag, #placemaking.Three...[read more]

Making Benches Work

September 12, 2016 by City Parks Blog

This article has been adapted from the September 2016 issue of Parks & Recreation Magazine, the official publication of the National Recreation and Park Association. Through its pursuit of key issues, trends, and personalities, the magazine advances American parks, recreation, and conservation efforts. You can read the full-length...[read more]

Observing the City: Exploring Dreams, Not Memes

September 9, 2016 by Chuck Wolfe

The participation of diverse voices in city decision-making processes is critical to successful urban change. By diverse, I mean not just professionals, politicians and pundits, but everyday people who live and work in city spaces. But before we can participate, we need to hone the power of personal observation.Like the Londoners...[read more]

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Cutting Global Pollution One Lawn At a Time

September 8, 2016 by Rose Rennar
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Many people don’t realize that lawns are large contributors to pollution. Once we all take into account the mowers that are used to keep the grass at a certain length and the emissions that they release into the air, the gasoline that is spilled and the water waste, the numbers are almost unbelievable.[read more]

What Can I Do to Keep My Yard’s Rainwater Out of Streams?

September 6, 2016 by Leda Marritz

One of soil’s many important functions is to act like a sponge. As nature’s blanket, soil soaks up water that falls as rain or melts from snow and ice. Soil not only stores water, it also helps to filter out pollutants such as nutrients, bacteria, and sediments that may collect as water moves over the surface of the earth. Eventually,...[read more]

Urban National Parks: The 21st Century Face of the National Park System

September 1, 2016 by City Parks Blog

The following is the first in a series of blog posts highlighting urban units of the National Park System.Urban national parks are often the unsung heroes of America’s national park system. As Americans continue their migration to cities in pursuit of economic opportunity, our national parks are rising to meet their needs. These ever-...[read more]

The Sidewalk Gray Zone

August 1, 2016 by Leda Marritz

As landscape architects, we are often under the impression that because we love urban trees and seeing new trees planted, that everyone around us will love these plantings as well. Some city dwellers do in fact welcome trees with great excitement, but others may see the trees as an intrusion of their private space or territory.A recent...[read more]

Can Parks Do Double Duty? Philadelphia Shows How

July 26, 2016 by City Parks Blog

Can a park be both a stormwater management unit and a recreation area? With proper negotiation, conversation, and careful planning, yes! However, it’s not common that goals easily jibe and that multiple benefits are received enthusiastically by every constituent. A rain garden can be beautiful, but if it replaces a soccer field, it might...[read more]