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Best Practices


Low Impact Housing for Cities

October 21, 2016 by Sebastien Miller

Low Impact Development (LID) is commonly defined as: ‘Development which, by virtue of its low or benign environmental impact, may be allowed in locations where conventional development is not permitted’ (1).  More understandably, this means that LID housing is temporary in nature, made of natural / locally sourced materials, and is...[read more]

Chicago Residents Utilizing Gentrification Index to Identify At-Risk Neighborhoods

October 19, 2016 by The Global Grid

Transit-Oriented Development being built in the Logan Square neighborhood.Long-time residents of Chicago’s Pilsen, Logan Square, and Bridgeport communities have complained anecdotally that their neighborhoods are gentrifying. John J. Betancur and Youngjun Kim, researchers with the Voorhees Center for Neighborhood and Community...[read more]

Some DC trash bins will soon get smarter with Enevo sensors

October 6, 2016 by Waste Dive

This post originally appears on our sister publication, Waste Dive. Our mission is to provide busy professionals like you with a bird's-eye-view of the waste industry in 60 seconds. To subscribe to our daily newsletter click here. Dive Brief: The DowntownDC Business Improvement District (BID) is planning to install Enevo...[read more]

On Urban Diaries: a 'Seeing the Better City' Prequel

October 5, 2016 by Chuck Wolfe

Andy Boenau (@boenau) is a Richmond, Virginia planner who manages a go-to podcast about human-scale urban solutions.  His "on-air" questions are always designed to invoke practical hints and examples for listeners, and I track his topics and guests on a regular basis.  This week, I was both flattered and pleased to be featured...[read more]


Time To Take The ‘Urban’ Out of Urban Design?

October 3, 2016 by Sebastien Miller

For a while now I’ve had an issue with both the term and the definition of ‘urban design’.  What exactly is it?  Compare it to architecture or planning, which are professions that are easy to define and identify, even to a child’s mind.  At its most simple level, architects design buildings, while planners design cities....[read more]

Learning From a One-Stop, Urban Epic–and Why

September 28, 2016 by Chuck Wolfe

Spoiler alert: I love epic stories with universal meaning for varied audiences around the world. In sum, that is why I think Jonathan F.P. Rose‘s new book will become a must-read classic. And, if 400-pagers are not your style, it’s at worst a well-written, must-browse wonder, with relevant lessons for us all.Rose is a real estate...[read more]

How Big Business Can Fix a Problem of its Own Making

September 22, 2016 by Yaniv Vardi

Our environment today exists under immense strain. It’s no secret that humanity’s current rates of consumption are unsustainable—especially in the developed world. The problem is a mix of over-demand, incredible waste, lack of regulatory oversight and poor material management. Broadly speaking, those factors share one common denominator...[read more]

Why My Twitter Stream is Singing About Placemaking

September 13, 2016 by Chuck Wolfe

My Twitter stream is alive with the sound of placemaking.  While those are not the exact Sound of Music lyrics we remember, I am as guilty as anyone for hyping Placemaking Week in Vancouver, British Columbia (which begins September 12), using the increasingly popular twitter hashtag, #placemaking.Three...[read more]

Observing the City: Exploring Dreams, Not Memes

September 9, 2016 by Chuck Wolfe

The participation of diverse voices in city decision-making processes is critical to successful urban change. By diverse, I mean not just professionals, politicians and pundits, but everyday people who live and work in city spaces. But before we can participate, we need to hone the power of personal observation.Like the Londoners...[read more]

Research Shows Trees in Bioswales Provide Significant Stormwater Benefits

August 16, 2016 by Leda Marritz

When we talk about the value of urban trees and soils as a stormwater management tool, the contribution of the trees is often considered secondary. Soil will, of course, store significant amounts of runoff all on its own. However, new research at the Morton Arboretum in Lisle, IL, has found that trees actually provided the largest...[read more]

ReGen Village Design Pushes for Self-Sustenance

August 14, 2016 by Tyler Caine

The rate and degree of evolution for building types and development patterns around the world may be one of the most critical decisions facing the fate of the biosphere over the next century. One developer/architecture team has recently rolled out a vision that does more than toggle the mainstream model, but proposes the framework for a cultural shift built around goals of balance.[read more]

Urban Planning "Games" A Novel Approach to an Old Problem

How do you liven up discussions around urban planning, get participants thinking outside of the box and get people to take a holistic and inclusive approach to community planning? Why not try a game?[read more]